What can A’zone new shops teach us?

I don’t often quote Amazon’s data-driven bookstores:

Other bookstores have books arranged according to best-seller lists, store-specific best-sellers, and staff recommendations, but I’ve never seen any store layout so extensively informed by data and where they tell you so much about why you’re seeing each item. Grocery store item placement is very data driven, but they don’t tell you why you’re seeing a display of Coke at the end of the aisle or why the produce is typically right at the entrance. It’ll be interesting to see if Amazon’s approach works or if people will be turned off by shopping inside a product database, a dehumanizing feeling Frommer hints at with “a collection of books that feels blandly standard” when compared to human curated selections at smaller bookstores.

And some hindsight:

(…)Overall, the store feels less oriented towards its book-buying customers and more towards driving Prime memberships, Amazon app downloads, and Kindle & Echo sales (which might be Amazon’s objective).

Matthias

Tim Carmody asked Kottke.org readers if they had ever seen, heard, or read something on the web that literally changed their lives. From the answers:

“Almost any woodworking video by Matthias Wandel.”

Go check.

Future looks like 6S spare parts in an alleymarket

If you liked Bunnie Huang’s book “The Essential Guide to Electronics in Shenzhen” (Crowd Supply), you will love Scotty’s adventure recycling/refurbishing an iPhone 6S in the used cell phone market just south of Huaqiangbei, Shenzhen, China.

The most interesting is not the geeky stuff, but Scott’s comments on how the 2017 Shenzhen he navigated to get his 6S parts is…

…like visiting the future, this crazy, dystopian, Blade Runneresque future.

(quote from the video, @1’14)

The future is already here, it’s just not very evenly distributed.

William Gibson

(via HaD)

Commander General

On December 1, 2016, President-elect Donald Trump announced that General James Mattis, former US CENTCOM, would be nominated to serve as United States Secretary of Defense in the coming administration. Foreign Media were quick to pick up on the nickname “Mad Dog”. It seems he is more than that. See what his former PAO (back when he was Commander general of the US Marine Corps) learnt from him about Real Leadership.
You can also read the original (written in milspeak) CG Staff Guidance (pdf).

Gretel C. Kovach, a San Diego journalist who specializes in USMC, pointed out in 2013 (the year he resigned from the Corps) that James Mattis also goes by the nicknames of “Chaos” (his callsign) and “Warrior Monk”. But the press prefers Mad Dog…

Secret travel agent

Hacking the Global Distribution Systems (GDS). Joseph Cox reports on the findings of SR LabsKarsten Nohl and Nemanja Nikodijevic: It’s Incredibly Easy to Tamper with Someone’s Flight Plan, Anywhere on the Globe (Motherboard)

Armed with these techniques, a hacker might be able to track someone, finding out where they’re flying to and from. Working with the German TV station ARD, the researchers were able to change the flight booking of a reporter, putting him on the same flight as, and in an adjacent seat to, a German politician.

Original conference 27 Dec 2016 @Chaos Communication Congress (Slides)

(via Boing Boing)